Overview and Target Audience

This course is focused on how understanding of bariatric surgery’s effects on behavioral and psychosocial patterns is evolving in response to recent and ongoing research that capitalizes on advances in research methodology that allow these issues to be studied in new and more sophisticated ways. The course will highlight behavioral and psychosocial factors with the greatest impact of health outcomes after bariatric surgery (i.e., eating and physical activity), those with newly recognized importance (cognitive functioning and impulsivity), those of heighted concern to healthcare providers (disordered eating and addictive behaviors). The course will include an emphasis on advances in research methodology and the specific findings that they are yielding, and the practical implications of these findings, including strategies for identifying and treating common behavioral and psychosocial problems occurring after bariatric surgery. The course therefore targets the broad audience of healthcare providers with an interest and investment in behavioral health following bariatric surgery, and the scientific community.

Objectives

  • Describe how understanding of bariatric surgery’s effect on behavioral and psychosocial patterns (both positive and negative) is evolving in response to recent and ongoing research.
  • Explore emerging research on bariatric surgery’s effect on cognitive functioning and related behaviors, particularly impulsivity.
  • Evaluate the effects of bariatric surgery on eating behavior, with an emphasis on altered food reward a preferences, and how these effects contribute to weight loss.
  • Review changes (or lack thereof) in physical activity and sedentary behavior commonly occurring after bariatric surgery, and the importance of modifying these behaviors to maximize surgical outcomes.
  • Consider the effects of bariatric surgery on specific aspects of psychopathology, specifically addictive disorders and loss of control eating, and innovative approaches to treating these problems.
  • Explain recent advances in research methodology that allow for a more sophisticated understanding of how behavioral and psychosocial factors change in response to bariatric surgery, and how they are related to success and risk after surgery.

1:30pm Course Introduction
Dale S. Bond, PhD
1:35pm Addictive Disorders after Bariatric Surgery
James Mitchell, MD
1:55pm Changes in Food Reward and Preferences after Bariatric Surgery
Hollie Raynor, PhD RD LDN
2:15pm Loss of Control Eating after Bariatric Surgery
Andrea Goldschmidt, PhD
2:35pm The Role of Executive Functions in Bariatric Surgery Outcomes
Rachel Galioto, PhD
2:55pm Inactivity and Prolonged Sedentary Behavior: Two Priority Health Risk Behaviors in Bariatric Surgery Patients
Dale S. Bond, PhD
3:15pm Question & Answer Panel
3:30pm Break
3:35pm Ecological Momentary Assessment of Behavioral and Psychosocial Predictors of Weight Loss After
Graham Thomas, PhD
3:55pm Behavioral, Psychosocial, and Environmental Predictors of Weight Loss Failure and Regain
Karen J. Coleman, PhD
4:15pm Psychopathology, Disordered Eating, and Impulsivity as Predictors of Weight Loss and Behavioral Outcomes after Bariatric Surgery
David Sarwer, PhD
4:35pm Mathematical Modeling to Identify Behavioral and Psychosocial Predictors of Bariatric Surgery Outcomes
Diana Thomas, PhD
4:55pm Treatment of Loss of Control Eating Following Bariatric Surgery
Valentina Ivezaj, PhD
5:15pm Question & Answer Panel
5:30pm Adjourn